SalixOS 15 Beta

Hardly the “dead project” that some people wrongly assumed, Slackware-based SalixOS, which I have posted on before, is still n Beta development and not yet suitable for “mission-critical” use on the desktop. SalixOS attempts to make Slackware suitable for intermediate-level Linux desktop users, with some sweet GUI tools and such. It’s “Linux for Lazy Slackers.”

I think that packaging is going to be a big deal with the new Salix. Appimages and Flatpaks may be the way to go, at least for now, since Sourcery is obsolete now and gslapt-get doesn’t work nearly as well now as it always did in Salix 14.2. Theming breaks the simplest of apps, and it’s trial-and-error to get things working as they should. Even Micro$oft Winblows does a better job of running open-source apps like LibreOffice, believe it or not. SalixOS is definitely not ready for prime time, but then it doesn’t claim to be. Theming, especially if you like dark themes as I do, is still a big problem so far.

My current daily driver remains my own highly-modified Xfce version of antiX, with it’s wicked-kewl tool set and it’s complete absence of twisted systemd and Pulseaudio crap “there as a necessary dependency for other applications but otherwise but not used.” Why fill up the hard drive with all that?

It’s the same issue with Flatpaks, appimages, and snaps on Slackware/SalixOS. Flatpaks and appimages fill up the hard drive with libraries that aren’t shared by all the apps that depend on them. It’s fine if you have a 500-zillion terabit hard drive, but come on already. If the old Slackware philosophy of one application per task remains in effect, but applications don’t share libraries or dependencies, what the heck! I say one library per app is not in keeping with one app per task. Wasted disk space on an aging hard drive is not a good practice. That said, I think that if gsplat-get catches up in Slack/Salix to be like what it was in the previous stable version, Salix will be awesome. So here’s hoping.

With gratitude for those who can handle the testing, and for the careful devs who create and maintain both Slackware and SalixOS, hats off. I salute you!